35 Comments

So, my grandma was right, all those years ago: rinse and gargle with a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide when getting sick. My grandfather called it Holy Water and used it on minor scrapes.

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Such simple inexpensive solutions - if any of this was about health we'd have been told 2 plus years ago. Still, good to know. Thanks.

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I have been using a nasal spray. mouthwash and vitamin D for several years. I am a not vaxxed MD and have not had covid. Everyone else has in my group of vaxxed and boosted fools

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wow! a great find... peer reviewed as well (how did that get by the censors??!!)....

...."with no virus RNA detected a median of four days earlier compared to placebo (three vs seven days; p = 0·044)"

Here's the paper link: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lansea/article/PIIS2772-3682(22)00046-4/fulltext

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I’ve been using XLear which is mainly xylitol and water for a few months to clear out my nose. I have no noticed no Ill effects with a daily use.

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Gallaher and Gary created the AEROSOL VERSION of peptide fusion inhibitor to keep themselves safe and yet nobody even talks about it. We hear about intranasal interventions although intranasal instillation of virus does not reflect a natural route of exposure. "In contrast, inoculation via aerosol inhalation (AR) more closely resembles human exposure to influenza virus."https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5725743/

"Gallaher modelled the HIV spike. He & Garry did the same with SARS. That same year, he created the First FDA approved fusion inhibitor, Fuzeon. He touted it in his 1/29/20 80-page little book on nCov. And then the SARS spike in 2003. Within 5 months, the FDA had cleared his peptide fusion inhibitor. Fuzeon. What he discovered is that there was potential for fusion inhibitors that worked on HIV to also work on h-Cov’s The WIV was really into peptide inhibitor research. They were also working on HIV vaccines. They knew, just as Gallaher had pointed out in 2003, that including enough of the HIV inserts to construct the gp120/gp41 would allow them to use a peptide fusion inhibitor instantly to keep themselves safe. They’d even created an AEROSOL version, which is certainly fortuitous since the standard intranasal spray would be less effective against SARS-CoV-2,which could attach to the lungs in far greater quantity due to Furin Cleavage site"

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I do not get it. So many virologist yet nobody created an aerosol version of peptide fusion inhibitor? How hard is it?

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I ordered NONS from Israeli online pharmacy. It arrived (in Australia) within 4 days via DHL (they paid for the delivery) Really happy! Haven't tried the spray as I don't have any symptoms but the delivery was FAST.

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I have been using nasal spray, mouthwash and vit D supplements for the last several years. I am an MD and unvaxxed and no h/o covid. Unlike my partners who are all vaxxed and boosted and infected with covid

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Makes me sad to know that the Vancouver based company (Enovid - Sanotize) was seeking Health Canada approvals very very early on in the pandemic. Clinical trials(tho small) were being done right here in Canada. Just think about how many people could have been helped by this product and others similar, had they been available for use right from near the start. I followed the Vancouver nasal spray from early on and soon realized something was not sitting right - a very likely harmless inexpensive product that could help - was being totally ignored in Canada and probably being silenced. Once I became aware it was being made available for shipment out of Israel at a relatively high price I was further sickened knowing how difficult it would be for Canadians to try to obtain it having to order it from across the world and then hoping it would even show up with risk of not passing through border scrutiny. As a non science person but a seeker of truth, my eyes have been wide opened to the sickness of what is going on in my Country.

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Oh those pesky studies providing simple solutions.

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Our natural immune system has developed over a million years into being pretty effective on its own. I’d be careful about thinking chemical can do a better job and risk interfering and damaging it by over medicating.

New antibacterial defense mechanism discovered in the nose

Written by Monica Beyer on November 14, 2018 — Fact checked by Carolyn Robertson

The human body has several built-in defenses that protect against illness, but some of these processes are still a mystery. Recent research reveals new insight into how the nasal airway works to protect us from bacteria.

Nose breaking through wall

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Researchers have found a new bacteria-fighting mechanism in the nose.

A team from Massachusetts Eye and Ear developed and reported the research, publishing it in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Researchers discovered that cells secrete small fluid-filled sacs called exosomes when we inhale bacteria. Once secreted, exosomes promptly attack the bacteria and also send antimicrobial molecules to nearby areas in the nose.

A team led by Dr. Benjamin Bleier, a sinus surgeon at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and associate professor of otolaryngology at Harvard Medical School, wanted to expand on previous findings where they discovered that proteins found in the cells of the nasal cavity were also present in a person’s nasal mucus.

How exosomes work

The researchers were interested in finding out how exosomes were moving from the cells into the mucus.

To do this, they collected the mucus of participants and grew their cells out in laboratory culture. To determine what happened when these cells came into contact with germs, they simulated exposure to bacteria and then calculated the number of released exosomes.

The results showed that exosome numbers “swarmed” — they doubled after bacterial exposure, as did antibacterial molecules.

“Similar to kicking a hornets’ nest, the nose releases billions of exosomes into the mucus at the first sign [of] bacteria, killing the bacteria and arming cells throughout the airway with a natural, potent defense.”

Dr. Bleier, senior author

The team then conducted experiments using patients and discovered that the resulting exosomes successfully killed the bacteria — as effectively as antibiotics, even.

As Dr. Bleier explains, “It’s almost like this swarm of exosomes vaccinates cells further down the airway against a microbe before they even have a chance to see it.”

The researchers also showed that these exosomes were taken up by other cells in the area and could share their antimicrobial molecules. This was the answer the team was after.

The exosomes can help cells at the back of the nose prepare to fight off bacteria, as well, before they even get there, which is a neat vaccination-type boost to our body’s initial defenses.

Why mucus is important

There is another natural defense inside the nasal airways that we probably don’t think about often, and when we do, we probably don’t think about it fondly.

Mucus tends to become an issue when we have a cold virus or allergies, and it can feel like a nuisance. However, mucus is one way our bodies deal with pathogens and eliminate them before we become sick.

The human body produces mucus continually, and it covers 400 square meters of surface area inside every adult — about the size of a basketball court.

Sites that produce mucus include our lungs, digestive system, urinary tract, reproductive tract, eyes, and nose.

Mucus helps trap pathogens that break through one of the body’s entry points, and it helps kill those germs or isolate them. As far as the nose goes, a person can then blow the germs out with a tissue.

Exosomes in drug research

The latest research on exosomes helps scientists understand the immune system a little better and may lead to a new way to deliver medications.

In the future, it could potentially lead to the development of drugs that take advantage of this natural transportation process already in place in our bodies.

As a group of cells can transport antibodies down the airway to ward off attacks in places where bacteria have yet to invade, it may be possible to use this innate system to shuttle medications along the same pathway.

As Dr. Bleier observes, “The nose provides a unique opportunity to directly study the immune system of the entire human airway — including the lungs.”

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The prices you are quoting are for multiple bottles of NONS. They dont ship 1 bottle. They pay for delivery so minimum order is 2 or 4 , if i remember correctly. I asked Sanotize where can I buy NONI. They havent mentioned any other pharmacies except Israeli. I am sharing bellow the email from Sanotize. Their repy about authorised sellers. I did buy from buyenov.com. it turned out they are an online seller who has contracts to sell online for the group of israeli pharmacies Sanotize refrenced in their email to me. I am happy because it arrived in record time. Hope this helps.

"Thank you for your email and interest in our spray. We do not have regulatory approval for Enovid in Australia.

As far as we know, buyenov.com is not an authorized SaNOtize seller. Enovid is for sale through selected pharmacies in Israel.

For further information, please see the following link: https://www.enovid.co.il

Thank you kindly and best regards

SaNOtize Research and Development Corp.

Email: info@sanotize.com

https://www.linkedin.com/company/27135466/admin/

https://www.sanotize.com

Fill out our survey!: https://sanotize.com/customer-survey/

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Hi Dr. Alexander. How does Xclear rate to sanitizing the nasal passages for Ci9?

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There was an Israeli doctor that was successfully treating patients with this type of application.

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